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Famous Sculptures

Boxer at Rest statue

Boxer at Rest statue

Regular price $3,792.27 USD
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The bronze Boxer at Rest, also known as the Terme Boxer or Boxer of the Quirinal, is a Hellenistic Greek sculpture of a sitting nude boxer at rest, still wearing his caestus, a type of leather hand-wrap. It has been given various dates within the period of about 330 to 50 BCE. It was excavated in Rome in 1885, and is now in the collection of the National Museum of Rome, normally displayed in the Palazzo Massimo alle Terme. The Boxer at Rest is one of the finest examples of bronze sculptures to have survived from the ancient world, survivals from the period are rare, as they were easily melted down and transformed into new objects. The work comes from a period in Greek art where there is a movement away from idealised heroic depictions of the body and youth, and an exploration of emotional themes and greater realism. The statue was excavated in Rome in 1885 on the south slope of the Quirinal Hill near the ancient Baths of Constantine, where it is thought to have been displayed. The sculpture was buried intentionally in late antiquity, possibly to preserve it against the barbarian invasions that ravaged Rome in the fifth century A.D. The broad-shouldered, lanky pugilist is shown seated, resting after a match. His gloves—which are highly detailed—identify him as a boxer. image source The athlete’s many head wounds are consistent with ancient boxing techniques, in which the head was the main target. The copper inlays, indicating blood, heighten the effect. The boxer’s right eye is swollen, his nose is broken, and he breathes through his mouth, probably because his nostrils are blocked by blood. His scarred lips are sunken, suggesting missing teeth. The ears, swollen from blows, indicate possible hearing loss. Drops of blood from the wounds on his head have trickled down his right arm and leg. Wear on the foot and hands suggests that they were touched frequently in antiquity, possibly in veneration. Because the iconography is related to statues of Herakles sculpted by Lysippos in the fourth century B.C., the Boxer at Rest may have been meant to celebrate a mythical—or real—boxer, who was glorified for his endurance and courage. Scholars have long debated the date of the statue, placing it anywhere from the middle of the fourth century B.C. to the middle of the first century B.C. The sculpture is an exceptional work in bronze from the Hellenistic period (323–31 B.C.) and is of outstanding artistry. Collection and optimization of data: This model was constructed using two types of 3D scanning from two variants of the sculpture. Structured Light scanning was used for a plaster copy of the sculpture at The University of Cambridge's Faculty of Classics, and photogrammetry for the original at the Museo delle Terme, Rome

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Please, if you like any sculpture but you are not sure how it will look like in real life, write us an email and our managers will give you all the information you need.


Sculpture reproductions are a popular way of making art more accessible. We use several methods to create reproduction sculptures, each with its unique process.

  • Creation of plastic sculptures:

To create a plastic sculpture reproduction, we use 3D printing technology. The first step is to print a plastic version of the original sculpture using a 3D printer. After 3D printing, we process the plastic sculpture by hand, which includes sanding, smoothing, filling any gaps or imperfections, and covering the sculptures with a special material to ensure durability for outdoor use. Our goal is to create a high-quality replica that faithfully reproduces the original sculpture. Once the plastic sculpture has been sanded and smoothed, we paint it by hand using high-quality paint in plaster, marble, bronze, and other colors to achieve a durable finish.

  • Creating impressions:

Many reproductions are created using environmentally friendly materials such as marble, plaster, and bronze. These materials are used to create high-quality replicas that look and feel like the original sculpture. The process of creating a casting involves making a mold of the original sculpture and then pouring the chosen material into the mold. This process requires a lot of manual work to keep the shape accurate and without air bubbles.

After the material has hardened, we remove the mold and clean and finish the reproduction by hand. This process ensures that each sculpture is a high-quality copy of the original sculpture.

Creating reproductions of sculptures requires great skill and attention to detail. Regardless of whether we use 3D printing technology or traditional casting methods, our goal is always the same: to create a high-quality replica of the original sculpture that accurately reflects the artist's vision. With the use of environmentally friendly materials and an emphasis on manual work, we ensure that our reproductions are of the highest quality.

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  • Production and delivery time

Sculptures up to 18 inches in size take 2 to 3 weeks to produce. We do not have mass production, as each sculpture is handmade by our craftsmen, making each sculpture unique. Sculptures larger than 18 inches require different lead times, depending on the size and complexity of the sculpture and its coating. Our managers will let you know the lead time for custom orders.

Delivery takes on average 2 weeks from the time of shipment. Since we are located in Ukraine, delivery time depends on the recipient country. But usually it is not more than 3 weeks anywhere in the world.

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